Dear Elsie

Postcards to my Grandmother

Postcard 227

“How is Mr Prince does he still come down to see you. “

Front

A woman wearing a pale blue draped dress, stands at a well with a jug. It is evening and the moon can be seen behind her. The card is captioned: A water witch. The image is sunk into a white frame.

163 Postcard front

Back

Headed: The Milton Post Card with a logo and Trade mark Milton in the centre of the heading. The card has a divided back. The left side is labelled: For communication this space may be used, the right: The address only to be written here. The stampblock is outlined and inside is written: Printed at our works in Germany. The left margin reads: The Milton “Glazette Sunk Mount” series No. 114 Woolstone Bros, London E. C. 163 Postcard back

Transcription

Dear Elsie Just a line so you don’t forget me. So you are back at your old place again. How is Mr Prince does he still come down to see you. Anyway don’t you go for any more walks over the Manawatu Bridge, well dearie space is scarce so must ring off now. Kind regards to all and stacks to yourself from Louie Leith Road, Okato, NP

Commentary

This undated card poses more questions than it answers. Who is the sender, Louie? Or at least I think that is the name. They give their address: Leith Road, Okato, New Plymouth, but without a date looking through the electoral rolls could take some time. A quick search of those that are indexed reveals many Louies who lived in New Plymouth. I wonder, is Mr Prince a real name or a nickname. Could this be the ‘Wanganui Boy’ mentioned by Jean Webster? Again, there are too many men with the surname Prince in Wanganui to identify which one – assuming it is a reference to the same person. If I look for a man with the surname Prince, from Wanganui and who fought in WWI that limits to a Charles Prince from Wetmere, Wanganui but that is quite a stretch. Gustave Woolstone traded as Woolstone Brothers. He chose the bust of Milton as his trademark as his first offices were on Milton Street, London. They were most well known for a wide range of novelty cards.

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2 comments on “Postcard 227

  1. Pingback: Postcard 268 | Dear Elsie

  2. Pingback: Postcard 296 | Dear Elsie

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